Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Animals Mistreated at Closing Harvard Lab

My opinion: Though many people are aware of animal research centers, I think there are many efforts to keep them concealed.  A research assistant once told me that she was not allowed to discuss research practices with outsiders, as animal rights activists could form a protest outside of the lab.  Perhaps this is why Harvard chooses not to disclose all of the information surrouding the closing of their primate facilities.  Though this may solve the problem at Harvard, relocating the primates could potentially transfer it to other schools.  Is animal research more of a local issue, or are there widespread issues that may impact animals across the country?  Also, it will be interesting to see what Harvard does, if anything, to open a new research center.  I'm not so sure the researchers are willing to give up so easily - maybe they'll find new (and similar) things to research that avoid legal troubles? 

 

Harvard Medical School Plans to Close Primate Research Lab


Tom Landers/Globe
Harvard University announced on Wednesday that it would shut down its primate research center. The facility has been cited for animal welfare violations in recent years, but the university said the closing stemmed from a tough economic climate and shifting strategies.
The school announced Tuesday that it would close the facility, the New England Primate Research Center in Southborough, Mass., over the next two years. Harvard said financial uncertainties were behind the move, but the laboratory has been cited in recent years by the federal Department of Agriculture for failing to comply with the Animal Welfare Act, and four primates have died there since mid-2010.
The center, which has operated for nearly half a century and has contributed to research on AIDS and other diseases, employs about 200 people, including research faculty and support staff. It is one of eight national primate research centers that, in all, received about $87 million from the National Institutes of Health last year.
The N.I.H. official, Dr. James Anderson, a deputy director, said there were currently about 130 research projects at the Southborough center. N.I.H. officials, along with representatives from Harvard and the other national research centers, will review them case by case, he said. “They all work closely together; they know each other’s inventory,” Dr. Anderson said. “We’ll go through when and where to move the animals and projects.” 

From: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/25/science/earth/harvard-medical-school-to-close-primate-research-center.html?_r=0

Saturday, April 27, 2013

Presciption of Risky Drugs Highest in South

My opinion: I think the patterns listed in this article may be used to discover other patterns across America, such as the prescription of risky drugs to younger individuals.  But to infer on those other patterns, it might be best to understand that causes of this one.  For example, if the patients receiving these drugs are poor, then perhaps they cannot afford the safer alternative, which may be more expensive.  The article also mentions that the doctors prescribing these drugs may be used to outdated ones.  I know that older doctors prescribe different drugs (especially more name brands) than their younger counterparts.  And finally, could there be a lack of medical understanding and/or access to healthcare, and why?  Perhaps more medical conventions should be held down south, and older doctors could be integrated into such conventions and other groups to build upon their education.  Can anyone think of other reasons?  Feel free to comment.

 

Seniors In The South Are More Apt To Be Prescribed Risky Drugs

Seniors in the Southeast were much more likely to be prescribed more than one high-risk medications in 2009.
Seniors in the Southeast were much more likely to be prescribed more than one high-risk medications in 2009.
Danya Qato and Amal Trivedi/Alpert Medical School, Brown University
Health care types have spent years trying to make the point that seniors are being prescribed medications that are unnecessary and dangerous. But the message hasn't really sunk in.
More than 20 percent of people with coverage are taking at least one high-risk medication, a new study finds.
People in the Southeast are especially vulnerable, the data show. In many parts of the South, more than one-third of seniors are taking drugs that they should avoid or sub out for something safer. Ten percent are taking two or more.
"Geography really stands out," says , an associate professor of health services policy and practice at Brown University's Alpert Medical School. He's a co-author of the , which was published in the April Journal of General Internal Medicine.
More than 38 percent of Medicare Advantage enrollees in Albany, Ga., got at least one risky drug, compared with 10 percent in Mason City, Iowa, the area with the lowest rate. The people prescribed risky drugs were more likely to be poor, white and female.
Why are Southerners more likely to be given risky meds? It could be that patients are asking for them, Trivedi says. Or it could be that doctors there are more apt to stick with old prescribing habits. But whatever the reason, he says, it's a marker for poor-quality health care.
The risky drugs include obvious culprits like amphetamines, barbiturates, muscle relaxants and narcotics. Then there are old-style sedating antihistamines, and medications for depression and anxiety, such as long-acting diazepam, or Valium, which can cause apnea and cardiac arrest. Many of the drugs increase the risk of falls.

From: http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/04/11/176910528/seniors-in-the-south-are-more-apt-to-be-prescribed-risky-drugs

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Illegal Immigrants Deported in the Middle of Hospital Treatment

My opinion:  Though this ties into the overall immigrant issue in this country, I believe that these situations involve extra problems.  It is still debatable whether illegal immigrants should be allowed to stay in this country.  However, if they need immediate healthcare, is it really ethical to deport them right away?  What's even worse is that the hospital did not consult the legal system before sending the men off.  At the very least, the hospitals should be more aware of the laws, but then again, the laws could be changed to create more beneficial outcomes.  It would be interesting to see if Canada supports illegal immigrants in this manner, considering that the country has universal healthcare.  Also, if something like this occurred to an uninsured European citizen in America, would the same thing happen?  Or is there a stigma that makes illegal Hispanic immigrants more prone to deportation?  Finally, I'd like to know how the patients are treated when airborne.  Is there a doctor, or are they just left alone?  What happens if they die in flight?  I think these questions need to be considered before even coming close to a reasonable solution.  Feel free to comment.

 

U.S. hospitals send hundreds of immigrants back home

Jacinto Rodriguez Cruz, 49, sits on a sofa inside his home in the city of Veracruz, Mexico.  Cruz and another friend suffered serious injuries during a car accident in May 2008 in northwestern Iowa. After their employers insurance coverage ran out, Cruz, who was not a legal citizen, was placed on a private airplane and flown to Mexico still comatose and unable to discuss his care or voice his protest. Hospitals confronted with absorbing the cost of caring for uninsured seriously injured immigrants are quietly deporting them, often unconscious and unable to protest, back to their home countries.
Jacinto Rodriguez Cruz, 49, sits on a sofa inside his home in the city of Veracruz, Mexico. Cruz and another friend suffered serious injuries during a car accident in May 2008 in northwestern Iowa. After their employers insurance coverage ran out, Cruz, who was not a legal citizen, was placed on a private airplane and flown to Mexico still comatose and unable to discuss his care or voice his protest. Hospitals confronted with absorbing the cost of caring for uninsured seriously injured immigrants are quietly deporting them, often unconscious and unable to protest, back to their home countries.
Photo by Associated Press /Chattanooga Times Free Press.
DES MOINES, Iowa — Days after they were badly hurt in a car accident, Jacinto Cruz and Jose Rodriguez-Saldana lay unconscious in an Iowa hospital while the American health care system weighed what to do with the two immigrants from Mexico.
The men had health insurance from jobs at one of the nation’s largest pork producers. But neither had legal permission to live in the U.S., nor was it clear whether their insurance would pay for the long-term rehabilitation they needed.
So Iowa Methodist Medical Center in Des Moines took matters into its own hands: After consulting with the patients’ families, it quietly loaded the two comatose men onto a private jet that flew them back to Mexico, effectively deporting them without consulting any court or federal agency.
When the men awoke, they were more than 1,800 miles away in a hospital in Veracruz, on the Mexican Gulf Coast.
Hundreds of immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally have taken similar journeys through a little-known removal system run not by the federal government trying to enforce laws but by hospitals seeking to curb high costs. A recent report compiled by immigrant advocacy groups made a rare attempt to determine how many people are sent home, concluding that at least 600 immigrants were removed over a five-year period, though there were likely many more.
In interviews with immigrants, their families, attorneys and advocates, The Associated Press reviewed the obscure process known formally as “medical repatriation,” which allows hospitals to put patients on chartered international flights, often while they are still unconscious. Hospitals typically pay for the flights.
“The problem is it’s all taking place in this unregulated sort of a black hole ... and there is no tracking,” said law professor Lori Nessel, director of the Center for Social Justice at Seton Hall Law School, which offers free legal representation to immigrants.
Now advocates for immigrants are concerned that hospitals could soon begin expanding the practice after full implementation of federal health care reform, which will make deep cuts to the payments hospitals receive for taking care of the uninsured.
Health care executives say they are caught between a requirement to accept all patients and a political battle over immigration.
“It really is a Catch-22 for us,” said Dr. Mark Purtle, vice president of Medical Affairs for Iowa Health System, which includes Iowa Methodist Medical Center. “This is the area that the federal government, the state, everybody says we’re not paying for the undocumented.”

From: http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2013/apr/24/us-hospitals-send-hundreds-immigrants-back-home/

Sunday, April 21, 2013

Massive Medical Study on Children Now Considered Unethical

My opinion: Ethics in the all workplaces are difficult to follow, although perhaps it is most serious in medicine, since people's lives may be in danger.  Since this study was originally given the go, the ethics committees must have been mislead along with the parents of the children.  Perhaps these ethics reviews are like arguments in an essay.  Though the research groups try to argue their point, they may have to cover up some of the concessions.  While it is difficult to redefine the argumentative process, especially since it is so widely used, is it possible to change this in the medical field?  I know that doctors are usually members of ethics committees, but should they look up the topic and investigate the research group throughout the trial to see if it is ethical?  Considering that this study involved so many medical groups and ethics committees, maybe these changes need to occur across the country.  Feel free to comment.

Med School study deemed unethical

A five-year study performed on premature babies has been deemed unethical by the Public Citizen Health Research Group.
The Support study, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), lasted from 2004 until 2009, and was led by researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham along with 22 other medical centers across the nation – including the Yale School of Medicine. Consent forms given to parents to sign were approved by local ethics committees, but did not include an adequate description of the risks to the premature infants, said Michael Carome, Deputy Director of the Health Research Group.
On April 10, Public Citizen issued a letter to the Department of Health and Human Services, which includes the NIH, calling for an apology to all the parents who entered their children in the study, according to The New Haven Register.
The 1,300 premature babies enrolled as subjects were randomly divided into two groups. The first received high levels of oxygen exposure, which Carome said increases the risk of eye injury or blindness, while the second received low levels of oxygen exposure, which Carome said increases the risk of brain damage and death. But the consent forms did not clearly stipulate any of these risks, instead “misleading” parents, Carome added.
“Consent is an absolutely essential ethical requirement, and we consider this research highly unethical,” he said. “The Department of Health and Human Services should apologize to parents of the children and that apology should be accompanied by a detailed description of what they weren’t told.”

From: http://yaledailynews.com/crosscampus/2013/04/20/med-school-study-deemed-unethical/

Thursday, April 18, 2013

How to Comfort Cancer Patients - Doctor Entertains to Relief Stress

My opinion:  Whenever I read articles or discuss medical specialties with others, the one key point they give me is this: DON'T go into oncology.  Many sources tell me that the death rate is so high, and it is incredibly distressing for doctors and patients, alike.  I know that there is a doctor shortage in all areas, and although I've never read it, I believe that oncology might be one of the hardest hit areas because medical students will not want to deal with so many deaths.  As an advocate for improved doctor-patient communication, I think this idea is just fantastic.  What's even better is that each song is personalized, helping the patient relate to it even more.  Some patients might prefer other types of activities during chemotherapy, such as poetry, but there are certainly many patients who will enjoy song-making.  Just a few questions.  May the doctor and the patient be the performer (or writer) or the audience at different times?  Or is only one way better?  Also, when making songs, is it possible to prevent them from becoming sad or disheartening?  What goes into making a happier, more hopeful song?  Feel free to comment.

Steven Eisenberg's Chemotopia: The Singing Doctor Who Will Melt Your Heart

An oncologist walks into a room full of patients in varying stages of cancer treatment, living each day scan to scan, some of whom have lost all their hair. He's got the standards: A white lab coat, his trusty stethoscope, and... a guitar?
Meet Dr. Steven Eisenberg, founder of Chemotopia, a San Diego-based initiative that makes every effort to lessen the blow of cancer treatment. He writes and sings songs to patients undergoing chemotherapy.
How can utopia, a word that implies a perfect world, ever be connected to cancer? Eisenberg explains that while chemo can be one of the scariest of all treatments, he wanted to create a place where patients understood every step of treatment, and where doctors were compassionate. A place where hi-tech meets hi-touch.
While Eisenberg uses song (each one is tailored to a specific patient's journey) as another aspect of care and "an anthem to listen to when they're really down and out," he recognizes that not all doctors will turn to music. The main goal is to redefine patient-doctor communication. Chemotopia urges patients and doctors to form a powerful relationship based on clear conversation by joining compassion and care with technology. The belief is that healing can begin once the doors of communication open.
At the end of the day, "Chemotopia is about having people get into the deepest part of themselves... that they are not their cancer," he says. "Cancer doesn't define a person. It's transformative, even for those who are incurable."

Monday, April 15, 2013

Scorpion Venom Helps Fight Cancer

My opinion:  Though I don't often hear of bizarre phenomenon as this, there are probably many natural chemicals that may be utilized to our advantage.  The issue is, it takes a lot of time to find them and learn what there effects are.  I've read that, if searching for such chemicals in a natural environment, only 1 in 100,000 may prove to be of any use.  The time and money that is put into this type of research is tremendous, as well as the impact on the environmentToday, many scientists synthetically create medicine in order to save themselves quite a bit of trouble.  The issue is, do scientists always know what to create?  I think that naturally occurring chemicals may be used as a reference point.  Perhaps if scientists research how these chemicals are effective, it will be easier to create different ones that have the same or similar properties.  Hence, the natural world must be studied (but preferably in a non-invasive manner) in order to progress in other scientific and medical venues.  Could this be incorrect, though?  Feel free to answer.

 Scorpions: Crush Cancer

Scorpion venom may serve a surprisingly beneficial purpose: helping brain surgeons excise malignant tissue easily and accurately. Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle Children’s Hospital Research Institute, and the University of Washington combined an extract of scorpion venom that naturally (and safely) targets only cancer cells with a molecule that glows under a special light. During surgery for brain tumors, doctors could inject the substance, spot glowing cancerous tissue, and remove every last millimeter of it, leaving only healthy tissue behind. Early studies suggest that the chemical could also illuminate prostate, breast, colon, and some skin cancers. Researchers have used the technique to treat cancer in animals; human trials are planned for the end of this year.

Read more: http://www.rd.com/slideshows/health-news-creepy-creatures-fight-disease-infection-and-more/#ixzz2QYQbRg9t

Friday, April 12, 2013

Should Doctors use Facebook, Twitter to Communicate with Patients?


My opinion:  As a fan of social media, it is sometimes difficult for me to understand why doctors should carefully control the use of their profiles on facebook and twitter.  I think the etiquette might be slightly different for both websites.  On twitter, doctors want people to follow them - anyone, really.  I'm following quite a few doctors who have thousands of followers.  But most write in their profiles that they are not giving medical advice, and that their opinions do not reflect those of their employers.  I understand that this may protect the doctors from being sued or hurting someone, but perhaps not always.  How do doctors know the different between general medical information and medical advice?  I think that medical information could be research findings and suggestions, but nothing instructional.  Should medical advice be called medical instructions, instead?  Now, getting to facebook, doctors cannot friend patients not only for boundary reasons, but because of confidentiality.  Many doctors of mine have communicated with me through a very private email system.  But, in the workplace, I think there is always some overlap into their personal lives whether they like it or not.  Don't patients want to acknowledge that their doctors are human, too?  Feel free to comment.

Facebook can complicate all sorts of relationships. Children and parents, teachers and students, and employees and supervisors all stand to benefit from keeping their personal lives separate from each other online. This is especially true for doctors- access to personal information aside from what's shared in the physician-patient relationship can interfere with proper care.
The Wall Street Journal reported last month that 35 percent of doctors in a Journal of General Internal Medicine survey had received Facebook "friend" requests from patients or their family members, and that 58 percent of those always rejected them; that still leaves a significant number of physicians setting themselves up for ethical ambiguity.
The American College of Physicians (ACP) and the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) laid out ethical guidelines for physicians' Internet activities in a new policy paper about online medical professionalism, published in the new edition of the Annals of Internal Medicine.
"It is important for physicians to be aware of the implications for confidentiality and how the use of online media for non-clinical purposes impacts trust in the medical profession," said Dr. Humayun Chaudhry, president and CEO of the FSMB, in a news release.
Read more at http://www.medicaldaily.com/articles/14634/20130411/doctors-stop-friending-patients-facebook.htm#sjolK2rYBbjfdOzE.99

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Patients Take Pets' Medication: A Common Occurrence

My opinionI actually was not expecting a story like this - I've heard of people who take their pets' medications on purpose, rather than by accident.  I think it's important to consider both situations in order to understand the depth of the problem.  Also, this makes me wonder how often an individual's medication is mixed up with another human's medication.  With households of multiple people, this could potentially be disastrous.  Though the elderly might be more likely to do so, they probably aren't living with as many people, so I'm not sure how common this is among them.  If their sight is too poor to read the label, pet medications could come in different bottles and colors than human medication.  Also, to avoid taking another family member's pills, large labels could be placed around each container.  Since not all medicines come in the same orange bottle, these labels may be especially helpful for distinguishing any type of container.  Any other solutions?  Should doctors warn patients about this?  Feel free to comment.

http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/healthcare/People-taking-their-pets-medicine.html

People taking their pet’s medicine?

POSTED: Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 5:55 AM
Most people consider their pets as part of the family. But just like you wouldn’t want to take another family member’s medicines by mistake, you don’t want to accidentally take your pet’s medicine either.  Who would ever make that mistake? You’d be surprised how often it happens.
Our colleagues at ISMP in Canada heard from a consumer who reported that an elderly relative had accidently taken the family dog's deworming pills. Someone had placed the dog's pills on a bookcase. Later, the elderly relative moved the dog's pills to a bedside table, where other medicines were being stored. For several days the elderly relative then took the deworming pills, instead of a regularly prescribed medicine. The mistake was discovered when it was time to give the dog a dose of deworming medicine. The family member found the empty container on the bedside table and realized that the elderly relative had taken all of the dog's pills!
When the mistake was discovered, the elderly relative mentioned having felt sick for a few days earlier in the week, without knowing why. Fortunately, no serious harm occurred, but some pet medicines can be harmful if taken by humans.

Saturday, April 6, 2013

Money Matters: How Can Researchers Attract Ethnic Minorities?

My opinion:  Some of the information given in this article is a bit misleading.  For example, it indicates that African-Americans won't participate in research because they mistrust the medical community, but also that their interest in participating is high.  Perhaps only some find researchers difficult, and the greater interest of the entire population overrides this smaller group.  It s less contradictory, though, that African-Americans simply are not asked to participate.  Because they might have less access to health care in general, they also do not have access to research studies.  While it may be a stretch to find a solution for health care access, I don't think it would be as difficult to market participation to ethnic minorities.  However, the article doesn't mention that these minorities might only be interested in research because it provides them with money.  In my medical ethics course, I learned that researchers may attract participants with money, but any form of payment cannot be enticing.  In other words, the individual must desire to participate for other reasons, as well.  However, as far as I know, this is for cases where the participant could be coming from any group.  Is it ok to do this if only poorer ethnic groups are contacted?  I agree that this is necessary to discover how treatments differently affect different groups (especially for Hispanics, who are representing a larger and larger proportion of the USA).  But the main question is, how do we get a reasonable number of minorities to participate while adhering to ethical standards?  Feel free to comment.

From: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp

"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented.""For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
h"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Art in Hospitals Helps Communication Between Doctors and Patients

My opinion: In some of my classes, we discussed how writing personal narratives can be a source of relief for the patients.  But I think that these works of art, whether through painting, building, or writing are not put to their best uses without an audience.  The audience is the most key part of any work of art.  Many musicians reflect that listening to music on an iPod or performing in the studio is nothing like playing on stage in front of thousands of people.  In the case of a hospital setting, though, I think the audience is the friends, family, and caretakers of the patients.  By analyzing the art, the family and friends might better understand how to help the person recover at the home, and the caretakers might work to treat the patient in a different manner.  For example, if the patient creates a painting that depicts many eyes starring at something, perhaps the patient is feeling scared of the environment and those around him or her.  Maybe the caretaker could solve this issue by putting him or her in a room without a roommate, or by persuading the patient to participate in a fun and engaging social club.  But these cues within artwork are probably not good enough evidence alone - they should be supported by other signs and maybe (in some cases) by asking the patient.  Feel free to comment. 


From: http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/index.cfm?id=3794
The theme is short and simple:  Beyond Barriers.  But the underlying message, and the interpretation by more than 25 visual artists, is wide-ranging and diverse.
The juried show at The Bridge Art Gallery, located within the University of Rochester Medical Center, explores the barriers between people that hinder their ability to care for each other or to receive care for themselves.  Through a variety of media, the exhibit inspires visitors to consider many different meanings of the term “barrier.”  It also examines the struggles and rewards living organisms experience while trying to overcome barriers.
The selected works delve into personal stories of despair and spiritual awakening, stark mechanical shapes and Mother Nature’s exuberance, soldiers launching grenades and infants playing with toys. In Ghost Trolley, photographer Bob Reeves uses Photoshop to spread modern graffiti over an old trolley and set it on an abandoned track – overcoming boundaries with his imagination.