Thursday, June 13, 2013

Brain Scans at Emory University Suggest Best Treatment for Depression

My opinion Though diagnosis, as I always mention, is a very difficult part of medicine, I might not be incorrect if I said treatment was even more difficult.  A healthcare employee once told me that, in research, it may be possible to become better informed about the preliminary aspects of a disease, such as symptoms, but few people work toward a better treatment.  Hence, studies like this are extremely crucial, especially because so many people suffer from depression.  I think this brain scan they discuss may be complemented by an inquiry form.  Patients may be asked if they think they understand their inner feelings well.  If they don't think so, then perhaps cognitive therapy is the best because it would help the patients become at one with their emotions and develop self-awareness.  If they do think so, then maybe they lack serotonin in the brain and would be better off using antidepressants.  Since the same condition may arise from many causes, pinpointing those exact causes will probably lead to better treatment.  Two questions:  Would patients be more honest if they verbally expressed their feelings, or if they wrote them down?  Also, is there a way to measure the amount of serotonin in the brain?  Feel free to comment.

 

Could Brain Scans Reveal The Right Treatment For Depression?

Talk therapy is best for some people; antidepressants are better for others. Scientists say PET scans might help figure out early on what treatment a person needs.
Talk therapy is best for some people; antidepressants are better for others. Scientists say PET scans might help figure out early on what treatment a person needs.
iStockphoto.com
Finding the right treatment for depression can be a struggle. People find relief with the first treatment only 40 percent of the time. Trying different antidepressants or therapies can take months, which means months of suffering.
Scientists are trying to better the odds by searching for signals in the body or in behavior that could be signposts to the right treatment. Researchers at Emory University say that PET scans of the brain may help predict which people do better on SSRI antidepressants, and which would benefit most from cognitive behavioral therapy instead.
They scanned the brains of 65 people with depression, then assigned them to get either 12 weeks of treatment with an antidepressant or 12 weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy. Just 38 people had clear responses to either treatment at that point. Twelve did well with CBT, while nine failed to improve. Eleven did well with the antidepressant, while six had no improvement.
Then the researchers took those results and matched them up with the earlier PET scans, which reflected activity levels in different parts of the brain. The people who did well with cognitive behavioral therapy had less brain activity in the insula, a brain region that's involved in emotion and self-awareness. The people who did well with medication had a more active insula.

From: http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/06/13/191281803/could-brain-scans-reveal-the-right-treatment-for-depression
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf

Why Are You Really Tired?

Submitted by Craig Kelley and Christina L. Koch on June 13, 2013 – 6:58 pmNo Comment
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf

Why Are You Really Tired?

Submitted by Craig Kelley and Christina L. Koch on June 13, 2013 – 6:58 pmNo Comment
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpufmkcdl

Why Are You Really Tired?

Submitted by Craig Kelley and Christina L. Koch on June 13, 2013 – 6:58 pmNo Comment
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf

Why Are You Really Tired?

Submitted by Craig Kelley and Christina L. Koch on June 13, 2013 – 6:58 pmNo Comment
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf

Why Are You Really Tired?

Submitted by Craig Kelley and Christina L. Koch on June 13, 2013 – 6:58 pmNo Comment
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf

Why Are You Really Tired?

Submitted by Craig Kelley and Christina L. Koch on June 13, 2013 – 6:58 pmNo Comment
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf

Why Are You Really Tired?

Submitted by Craig Kelley and Christina L. Koch on June 13, 2013 – 6:58 pmNo Comment
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf

Why Are You Really Tired?

Submitted by Craig Kelley and Christina L. Koch on June 13, 2013 – 6:58 pmNo Comment
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf

Why Are You Really Tired?

Submitted by Craig Kelley and Christina L. Koch on June 13, 2013 – 6:58 pmNo Comment
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf

Why Are You Really Tired?

Submitted by Craig Kelley and Christina L. Koch on June 13, 2013 – 6:58 pmNo Comment
Sleep is a necessity for good health, top cognitive functioning, mood and wellbeing. According to a survey completed by the National Sleep Foundation, at least 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and 60% of adults have problems sleeping at least a few nights per week.
Many who suffer from sleep disorders go undiagnosed or do not seek treatment if they have been diagnosed. This can interfere with activities, such as work, school or driving, causing safety concerns.
The Sleep Disorders and Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit published a study in 2004 that demonstrated that sleepiness takes a toll on effective decision making. The effects of sleep deprivation can cause injuries at work or behind the wheel of a car or tractor-trailer by slowing the reaction time or causing deficits in decision making ability.
According to the Department of Transportation, 1-4% of all highway crashes are due to sleepiness, and in rural areas, 4% of these crashes are fatal. There are a number of factors that increase the risk of driving drowsy, including late night or early morning driving, patients with untreated sleep disorders and people who obtain six or fewer hours of sleep a day. Certain occupations hold a higher risk as well, such as medical residents, who tend to work very long shifts or night shift workers and commercial truck drivers.
It is a common misconception that you actually need less sleep as you grow older. As you get older, you may find it is more difficult to stay asleep eight hours, however, the average person requires eight hours of sleep for health and wellness.
- See more at: http://thesafetyreport.com/2013/06/why-are-you-really-tired/#sthash.hUqoXc0q.dpuf

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