Friday, May 24, 2013

Cell Phones May Diagnose Illnesses

 My opinion on the article:  I'm so glad that they are developing this so early.  In the book Physics of the Future, by Michio Kaku, there is a story about a person in the year 2100.  At one point in the story, the man is diagnosed with cancer, but he does not even know what cancer is.  This is because doctors invented small, robotic sensors that roam throughout the body.  These sensors track cancer in its early stages and immediately destroy it.  I think that these smartphone apps may be the beginning of this kind of technology.  Since so many people own smartphones, it makes healthcare more accessible for the masses.  Instead of going to see a doctor, the smartphone could make a quick and easy diagnosis.  This may also be done more frequently, although I don't think the machine should replace doctors.  Doctors should still conduct checkups to make sure that the individual's vital signs are normal, as the machine cannot necessarily check for every health related issue.  Should researchers invest more money into making cancer detectors, and leave other sensors for later?  Or should they investigate how the machine can treat illnesses?  Feel free to comment.

Smartphones Become Handheld Biosensors
Fri, 2013-05-24 09:43

University of Illinois researchers developed a cradle and app for the iPhone to make a handheld biosensor that uses the phone’s own camera and processing power to detect any kind of biological molecules or cells. (Source: University of Illinois/Brian T. Cunningham)University of Illinois researchers developed a cradle and app for the iPhone to make a handheld biosensor that uses the phone’s own camera and processing power to detect any kind of biological molecules or cells. (Source: University of Illinois/Brian T. Cunningham) From: http://www.biosciencetechnology.com/news/2013/05/smartphones-become-handheld-biosensors Researchers and physicians in the field could soon run on-the-spot tests for environmental toxins, medical diagnostics, food safety and more with their smartphones.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers have developed a cradle and app for the iPhone that uses the phone’s built-in camera and processing power as a biosensor to detect toxins, proteins, bacteria, viruses and other molecules.
Having such sensitive biosensing capabilities in the field could enable on-the-spot tracking of groundwater contamination, combine the phone’s GPS data with biosensing data to map the spread of pathogens, or provide immediate and inexpensive medical diagnostic tests in field clinics or contaminant checks in the food processing and distribution chain.

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