Saturday, April 6, 2013

Money Matters: How Can Researchers Attract Ethnic Minorities?

My opinion:  Some of the information given in this article is a bit misleading.  For example, it indicates that African-Americans won't participate in research because they mistrust the medical community, but also that their interest in participating is high.  Perhaps only some find researchers difficult, and the greater interest of the entire population overrides this smaller group.  It s less contradictory, though, that African-Americans simply are not asked to participate.  Because they might have less access to health care in general, they also do not have access to research studies.  While it may be a stretch to find a solution for health care access, I don't think it would be as difficult to market participation to ethnic minorities.  However, the article doesn't mention that these minorities might only be interested in research because it provides them with money.  In my medical ethics course, I learned that researchers may attract participants with money, but any form of payment cannot be enticing.  In other words, the individual must desire to participate for other reasons, as well.  However, as far as I know, this is for cases where the participant could be coming from any group.  Is it ok to do this if only poorer ethnic groups are contacted?  I agree that this is necessary to discover how treatments differently affect different groups (especially for Hispanics, who are representing a larger and larger proportion of the USA).  But the main question is, how do we get a reasonable number of minorities to participate while adhering to ethical standards?  Feel free to comment.

From: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp

"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented.""For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
h"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp
"For years, African-Americans have been underrepresented in research," said lead investigator Linda Cottler, chair of the department of epidemiology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions and the College of Medicine. "Reasons have included mistrust of the medical community and actually not ever being asked to participate in research. Our study shows that while the participation rate among African-Americans has been very low, their level of interest in research is high. This is exciting news and may reflect the influence of the community engagement programs of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards." More than 80,000 clinical trials are conducted each year in the United States, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in them. Women, the elderly, racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents are often underrepresented. "If we're not getting the participation of diverse groups when we're studying medications or interventions, then we don't know how those treatments will work in real life in different populations," said Cottler, associate dean for research and planning at the College of Public Health and Health Professions and co-director of community engagement for UF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute. "It's very important for people to have a voice and be represented."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-african-americans-keen-medical.html#jCp

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